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Open Access Highly Accessed Research

The Malaria in Pregnancy Library: a bibliometric review

Anna M van Eijk1*, Jenny Hill1, Sue Povall2, Alison Reynolds1, Helen Wong1 and Feiko O Ter Kuile1

Author Affiliations

1 Child and Reproductive Health Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5QA, UK

2 Division of Public Health, University of Liverpool, Whelan Building Quadrangle, Liverpool, L69 3GB, UK

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Malaria Journal 2012, 11:362  doi:10.1186/1475-2875-11-362

Published: 30 October 2012

Abstract

Background

The Malaria in Pregnancy (MiP) Library is a bibliographic database that was created by the MiP Consortium in 2005 and is updated every four months using a standardized search protocol. A bibliometric review was conducted of the contents of the Library to determine dynamics in the type, content and volume of literature on malaria in pregnancy over time.

Methods

Data on year of publication, type, language, country of first-author affiliation and content (topic) were extracted from entries in the MiP Library and plotted over time.

Results

By January 2012, the MiP Library contained 5,346 entries, consisting of 3,721 journal articles (69.6%), 697 reports (13.0%), 219 academic theses (4.1%), 92 books or book chapters (1.7%), 487 conference proceedings (9.1%), 68 registered studies (1.3%) and 62 ‘other’ (1.2%). Most of the sources were in English language (87.3%), followed by French (7.5%) and Spanish (1.5%). Over 40% of source material was publicly available online (42.4%) and the remaining with restricted access (35.0%) or otherwise unavailable (22.7%). The number of journal articles related to malaria in pregnancy increased from 41 in the 1960s, to 708 in the 1990s, and 1,895 between 2000 and 2009, and the variety of themes has increased over time. English-language articles were sourced from 737 different journals. The top three journals were the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (184), Malaria Journal (158) and the Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (131).

Conclusion

The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in publications related to malaria in pregnancy, and an increasing proportion of these are publically available online. The MiP Library is a useful, scholarly source for literature and systematic reviews related to malaria in pregnancy.

Keywords:
Malaria; Pregnancy; Bibliometrics